Cataract Surgery and Lens Replacement
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Is cataract surgery in your future?

In cataract surgery, the cloudy, natural lens is removed from the eye and in most cases a plastic lens replaces the natural lens to return eyesight.

Having cataract surgery is a personal choice, and depends on how well you are able to see during your daily activities.

If you have cataracts, you may notice that your eyesight is getting worse and that it is not better with glasses or contact lens. If it’s hard for you to do regular activities because of your eyesight, it may be time for cataract surgery.

Lens replacement

Most replacement lenses are made of a flexible material and are smaller than a dime.

Starting June 4, 2012, there will be significant cost savings to patients requiring lens replacement following cataract surgery.

  • Foldable, monofocal lens (the most common type of replacement lens) will be free to patients covered through the Medical Services Plan.
  • Patients who need cataract surgery will not pay for lens as long as they choose an insured lens (foldable monofocal lens). This includes consultation, visits, and testing for insured lens.

With cataract lens replacement, several types of lenses are available to help people enjoy better vision.  These include the insured monofocal lenses (used by about  90% of patients in BC) which offer vision at one distance only. Specialty lens may also correct other vision problems, allowing you to see without glasses or contacts, and can be purchased at an additional cost.

Choosing a non-insured (specialty) lens

If you want a specialty lens, you can buy these from Interior Health. You pay only the difference between the cost of the insured lens and the non-insured specialty lens you choose.

Please note that services beyond those provided by the Medical Services Plan (MSP) may require billing. 

MoH     PCQO