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Patient Care Quality Office
Patient Care Quality Office - Submit your feedback

Learn about the different options for sharing your feedback on the care that you or your loved ones have received.

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Getting a COVID-19 test

If you have symptoms and can manage your illness at home, you don’t need a test. Self-isolate and notify your contacts. Testing is prioritized for people at risk of more severe disease and people in higher risk settings.

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Mental Health & Substance Use Banner
Mental health

If you or someone you know is struggling with mental health – you’re not alone. Learn how to access different support services and access helpful resources. Reach your local Mental Health Centre for community-based supports by calling 310-MHSU (6478).

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Seniors care

Find information about home and community care options, long-term care, assisted living and other services located throughout the Interior region.

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Aboriginal Patient Navigator

The Aboriginal Patient Navigator service at Interior Health supports First Nation, Métis and Inuit peoples living in the southern Interior access health services. Aboriginal Patient Navigator services help clients navigate the health system. Learn more about how to contact Aboriginal Patient Navigator services near you.

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Substance Use & Addiction Services Banner
Substance use

If you or someone you know is struggling with substance use – you’re not alone. Learn how to access different support services and access helpful resources. Reach your local Substance Use Centre for community-based supports by calling 310-MHSU (6478)

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Digital Health Support

Need support with your Zoom virtual care calls? Digital Health Support helps people, caregivers and their families with a one-stop shop as they navigate IH virtual and digital tools to better their health care. Hours of operation: Monday-Friday, 7am-7pm. Closed on statutory holidays. 

National Indigenous History Month
June 1 marks the start of National Indigenous History month. This month is an opportunity to immerse ourselves in the distinct histories and cultures of First Nations, Inuit and Métis people. It is a chance to learn more about the Partnership Strategy and In Plain Sight reports to support our commitment to reconciliation and dismantling the systemic racism, and discrimination that Indigenous Peoples continue to face today.
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Healing circle.
CEO Message on National Indigenous Peoples Day
An excerpt from Interior Health CEO Susan Brown's message in honour of National Indigenous Peoples Day: "We take ownership of the systematic change and reconciliation required within the health system to eradicate anti-Aboriginal racism, advance cultural safety, and improve the health outcomes for Aboriginal peoples living in the Interior Region through equity-based health service delivery."
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555 D Cedar Avenue , 100 Mile House, BC V0K 2E0

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2592 Morton Road , Alexis Creek, BC V0L 1A0

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Baby & Children Health

Access health information from infant to youth on topics such as dental health, hearing, immunization, nutrition and other topics.

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Heart Health

Learn ways to lead a heart-healthy lifestyle and learn to recognize the signs of a heart attack. We offer many heart procedures and programs.

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Kidney Health

We provide renal programs and services to support kidney health. People who have been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease may be enrolled in the renal program to access services.

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Mental Health & Substance Use

We provide many mental health and substance use services. We strive to ensure our services are welcoming to all people, gender identities, cultures, ethnicities and backgrounds.

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Seniors Health

We offer a range of seniors health services alongside our partner agencies. We aim to make our services person-centred, welcoming of all peoples, gender identities, cultures, ethnicities and backgrounds.

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Surgery

Access information you need before, during and after your surgery. Learn about surgeries we offer and recovery tips.

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Stories@IH

Stories@IH

Community & Culture
Dr. Ilona Hale, on a ridge above 12 Mile Creek near Golden. Name: Dr. Ilona Hale (she/her/hers) Job Title: Family Physician Researcher Years of Service: 25 Worksite: Kimberley Medical Clinic Community: Kimberley Ancestral Territory: Ktunaxa Advice to live by: "Walk with the dreamers, the believers, the courageous, the cheerful, the planners, the doers, the successful people with their heads in the clouds and their feet on the ground. Let their spirit ignite a fire within you to leave this world better than you found it..." - Wilferd Peterson Dr. Ilona Hale is no stranger to small-town life – she was born and raised in the mining town of Lively in Northern Ontario. Now, Ilona is a rural family physician in Kimberley, as well as a clinician researcher. “I’ve always considered it an amazing privilege to practice medicine – to have the opportunity to be part of peoples' lives every day, and share tools to help them, even if it’s in a small way. When I see people getting better, it makes me want to keep going.”
2 Minute Read
Health & Wellness
A healing circle Everyone deserves to be heard, and to feel safe and understood, but it’s clear from the In Plain Sight Report this doesn’t always happen for members of B.C.’s Aboriginal communities. The Report, released November 2020, provides 24 recommendations for addressing Indigenous-specific racism within the B.C. health-care system. Among them was the development of a strategy that would improve patient complaint processes and address that racism, which is both individual and systemic. With this in mind, Interior Health saw a way to create a more culturally safe space for complaint resolution through its Patient Care Quality Office. That’s how Lucie Poisson and Natalie Daniels (pictured below) came to be new Aboriginal Patient Care Quality and Safety Consultants. Patients and clients who self identify as Aboriginal now have an option to be directed to Natalie and Lucie for direct follow-up. Aboriginal Patient Care Quality and Safety Consultants: Lucie Poisson (left) and Natalie Daniels "Something that came out of the In Plain Sight Report is that respondents didn't feel comfortable bringing their concerns forward, and one of the barriers to bringing concerns forward to an office such as ours is that people didn't feel their concerns were going to be taken seriously," says Natalie. Interior Voices podcast host Tracy Mooney recently met with Lucie, Natalie, and Shari McKeown, IH’s Director for Patient Safety, to discuss the new positions, and how they will contribute to better and more culturally safe recourse for people’s concerns. Culturally safe recourse means that a patient or client has control of how the resolution process looks. They might choose to submit their concern in writing, have a phone call, or meet in person. Or, they might request a healing circle, have family or friends present with them, or another restorative approach. "When a client is stepping forward with a concern or a story or an experience to share, that feedback is a gift for us and it leads to an opportunity to improve our care and services and make them safe for everybody's use," says Shari. As Interior Health continues to work to improve health care for all, these new positions provide a culturally safe space for Aboriginal patients and clients to share. "It's critical for us to hear from people about their experiences, worries and challenges in receiving care, or the omission of care, so that we can start to reconcile and take action," says Lucie. Learn more: Interior Voices podcast Interior Health Patient Care Quality Office In Plain Sight Report and Recommendations
2 Minute Read
Community & Culture
Nearly 10 per cent of Canadians have a condition that seriously impacts their quality of life, causing social isolation and withdrawal. It’s a widespread problem, especially with older adults because it increases with aging, yet more than half won’t discuss their condition with a primary care provider. It is the number one reason for premature admission to long-term care homes. We’re talking about urinary incontinence.  Bowel and bladder function have historically been a taboo subject that people are embarrassed to discuss. But 3.5 million Canadians find they leak urine when they walk, cough, sneeze, laugh, lift or exercise, or find they aren’t able to make it to the bathroom “in time.”  “Urinary incontinence is a sensitive topic and often a secret. If health-care providers don’t create a safe space to talk about it, people won’t tell. Because they are unaware they can get the help they need, people may withdraw from activities, become isolated and experience a reduced quality of life,” says Mary Kjorven, an Interior Health clinical nurse specialist and nurse continence advisor. According to the Canadian Urinary Bladder Survey, 16 per cent of men and 33 per cent of women over the age of 40 have symptoms of urinary incontinence.  Despite popular misconceptions, urinary incontinence is not a normal part of aging. It is a treatable symptom of a medical condition.   There are a wide range of therapies available, ranging from the non-invasive (lifestyle modifications, behavioral changes, fluid changes), to medications and surgical procedures. Education is key and there are a number of resources available, including services from a nurse continence advisor, physiotherapists with specialties in pelvic floor function, nurses specializing in wound, ostomy and continence, and evidence-based websites, including the Canadian Continence Foundation. “Getting help early prevents the problem from getting worse,” says Mary. “We have done a great job improving oral health in our society - we have incorporated brushing our teeth into our daily routines and as a result children get fewer cavities. We need to do the same thing with bowel and bladder health, beginning by making it safe to talk about.”
2 Minute Read
Community & Culture
Mother Nature is glorious but fickle – we never know what she is going to hand us. Folks in the Chilcotin are known to be resourceful and resilient, but our mettle was significantly tested during the massive firestorm of 2017, when three major complexes - the Plateau, Hanceville and West Chilcotin - burned 8,193 square kilometres. During the 2021 fire season, this area was under threat again as two significant wildfires at Big Stick Lake and Hotnarko Creek kept people living along the Highway 20 corridor on high alert. The West Chilcotin Health Centre is small, so we have to handle whatever walks through the door. The building has a generator that starts automatically when the power cuts to allow continuous care. We are equipped with radios to connect with the local Search and Rescue, various community repeater systems, a satellite phone and spot device with text-based communication, and a GPS location tied to our manager’s email should we need further emergency assistance. We stock bottled water and dry food along with a small warehouse of medical supplies in case our highway is shut down. Wildfire in the Cariboo Regional District During the 2017 wildfires, one of our biggest challenges was acquiring medications for patients while the highway was closed. Our nurse practitioner Patrice Gordon and I gathered information about what medications our patients needed; some patients are so remote they required visitation by horseback from Patrice. We called the prescriptions into a Shopper’s Drug Mart in Nanaimo and they flew the medications into Bella Coola, where the medications were picked up by the RCMP and driven to the clinic or the local manor, where I was assisting after hours making food for fire crews. The thing that I always take away from any disaster is how important it is to be fluid: for our patients and for ourselves. We must keep adjusting to whatever changes are thrown at us each day. No two events will ever be the same. Being prepared is so very important but being able to adapt within that emergency will always be the biggest asset. About the author Lee Anne Wright provides administrative support as a health unit aide in Alexis Creek and Tatla Lake. Natural Disaster Champions series In 2021, the B.C. Interior region experienced a natural disaster season like none other. Interior Health staff stepped up and came together to support each other, patients, friends, family and communities. We’re sharing the stories of staff members reflecting on how being prepared – at home and at work – can make all the difference when minutes matter. View more stories in the series

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Interior Health at a Glance

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834000+

Population
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4800+

Hospital Volunteers
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21000+

Staff
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1900+

Physicians