Vaccination Status Reporting Regulation (VSRR)
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B.C.’s new Vaccination Status Reporting Regulation (VSRR) came into effect on July 1, 2019. It supports the collection of immunization records of school-age children by Public Health so that all records are stored in one place, the provincial immunization registry. The regulation applies to public, independent, and home-schooled students in kindergarten through grade 12, including students who live in First Nations communities and attend school off-reserve. At this time, the regulation does not apply to students who attend schools in First Nations communities or children who attend daycares or Strong Start Centres

Are my child’s records already in the Registry?
Parents can check their child’s immunization history using the online Vaccination Status Indicator tool to see if their child’s immunization records are on file with Public Health. This tool does not provide any details about their immunization status or history.

What is Public Health’s role?
Public Health Units review the immunization records of all students, kindergarten to Grade 12. Public Health staff may contact families whose children have no immunization record or are missing immunizations. If you are contacted, you will be provided with information on how to get your child’s immunizations up to date.

What if my child has no immunization record?
You will receive a letter from Public Health if we do not have your child’s immunization record in the Registry.

How can I provide an immunization record for my child?
You can provide a copy of your child’s immunization record to your local Public Health centre.


What happens if I don’t provide my child’s immunization record to my health unit? 
If you choose not to provide your child’s immunization record to your local health unit, your child will be noted as unimmunized in the provincial registry. If there is a vaccine-preventable disease outbreak at your child’s school, your child may be asked to stay home from school until it is safe to return, which may be several weeks. This is important to help protect your child from getting sick with a vaccine-preventable disease and spreading the disease to others - including children who cannot be immunized due to medical reasons.

If I refuse vaccines for my child, will I be contacted and offered vaccines again? 
If you refuse vaccines for your child, the refusal will be noted in your child’s record in the registry. However, your health care provider may contact you to offer refused vaccines again in the future. You may also receive a phone call or a card in the mail from your local health unit, reminding you that your child is due for vaccines. This is because sometimes parents change their minds and may decide to vaccinate their children. Reasons for this include changes in a child’s health, an increase in the risk of infection, changes in beliefs, new information that a parent did not have before, and changes in vaccine recommendations. When your health care provider contacts you, it also gives you the chance to discuss any new information you may have and to ask more questions.


At a minimum, your health care provider may contact you to reoffer vaccines again at school entry and when your child is 10 and 13 years of age. You will also be contacted and offered vaccines for your child if they are unvaccinated, and there is a vaccine-preventable disease outbreak at your child’s school. If there is an outbreak at your child’s school and your child is unprotected, your child may be asked to stay home until it is safe to return. They may miss several days or weeks of school. This is to protect your child and their classmates.

Mature minors are able to consent to vaccines on their own, even if the parent has refused. You can read more about mature minor consent here.


What if my child is missing Immunizations? 
We encourage all students to be immunized with the recommended vaccines for their age.

Children in kindergarten can receive any missing immunizations at the same time as their kindergarten shot at their local health centre. Call to book an appointment.

Children in grades 6 and 9 will be offered any missing vaccines through school-based clinics.
 
Students and parents of children in all other grades with missing immunizations may receive a notice to call and book an appointment at their local health centre.

 
Additional resources:
As a step towards reconciliation, Interior Health acknowledges the land that we live, work, and play on as the traditional territories of the Dakelh Dene, Ktunaxa, Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, St’at’imc, Syilx and Tsilhqot’in peoples. It is with humility that we continue to strengthen our relationships with the First Nation, Métis, and Inuit peoples of the interior.
MoH     PCQO