Diabetes
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Children with diabetes follow a special diet and/or inject insulin

Diabetes is a disease where the body is not able to regulate its blood sugar because it is unable to produce any insulin (Type 1) or it can not produce enough insulin or properly use the insulin it does produce (Type 2). Most children with diabetes have Type 1.  Learn more about the different types of diabetes.

Children who have diabetes control this condition by watching what, when and how much they eat balanced with their activity, and if needed, also through pills or insulin injections. Children with Type 1 diabetes require insulin injections. Insulin helps control and lower blood sugar. When the blood sugar gets too low it can be life-threatening.

Symptoms of low blood sugar (Hypoglycemia)

  • Hunger
  • Sleepy/tired
  • Shaky/dizziness
  • Upset stomach
  • Mood changes or acting strangely
  • Sweating
  • Headache
  • Pale skin color
  • Weakness
  • Blurred vision
  • Unconsciousness or convulsions/seizures (severe)

In case of severe hypoglycemia, call 9-1-1.

Low blood sugar reactions are most likely to occur:

  • after more exercise than usual
  • after missing a snack or meal
  • when sick or having extra stress
  • after taking too much insulin

Important to note

It is important for students with diabetes that:

  • Medical Alert Planning forms and Request for Medication forms completed and returned to the school (visit Medical Conditions at School for more information)
  • medication and monitoring equipment (insulin, blood glucose meter, emergency snack) labeled and accessible to the student at all times
  • school personnel, as well as the student and family, have had education about diabetes, and are aware of emergency measures
  • the student wears MedicAlert identification at all times

Other resources

 

MoH     PCQO